2018 Course Calendar

2018 Courses2017-07-18T11:13:36+00:00
Sep
10
Mon
2018
Special Consideration for the Rural Court Judge: Web-Based
Sep 10 – Oct 26 all-day
Special Consideration for the Rural Court Judge: Web-Based @ Tulsa | Oklahoma | United States

Isolation, under-funding, lack of collateral social services in the community, and a high public profile. Do these things sound familiar? Judges in rural courts throughout our nation share a unique circumstance marked by these issues. This faculty-led online course shares techniques and experience from rural judges in meeting these challenges, and provides tools and suggestions to the participants which can be adapted in their courts as circumstances warrant.

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Why should I take this course?

As a rural court judge, you need a course tailored to your more sparsely populated community and jurisdiction. This faculty-led online course offers a convenient way to learn skills particular to the special nature of judging within a rural area, without having to leave your docket.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Identify areas of professional and personal isolation resulting from your service on a rural bench.
  • Analyze your role as judge on the Adjudicator and Agent-of-Change Continuum.
  • Identify and analyze provisions of the Code of Judicial Conduct addressing issues of particular challenge to the well-known rural judge.
  • Identify the ethics pitfalls in dealing with disruptive defendants and litigants.
  • Analyze how the rural judge can remain involved in his or her community within the context of proper judicial conduct.
  • Identify ethical issues posed by the dual roles of judge and lawyer and to comply with the ethical rules applicable to those issues.
  • Recognize the threats to judicial independence resulting from recent efforts to inject politics and social or economic agendas into court decisions.
  • Identify the purpose and limits of the inherent power of the court and how to effectively deal with other branches of government.
  • Create a plan to deal with threats and emergencies.
  • Describe the relationship of childhood trauma to delinquency.
  • Identify signs of traumatic stress in children by age group.
  • Recognize the phenomena of implicit bias.

Who should attend?

This course has been specifically designed for judges who preside over courts in rural areas and small, possibly isolated jurisdictions.

Who are the members of the faculty?

This course is taught by judges who preside over small and rural jurisdictions around the country, and understand the special issues confronting rural judges.

How is this course taught?

Discussion assignments, writing assignments, reading, video and weekly live calls with faculty ensure this course is highly interactive, demanding, and educational. It is anticipated that you will spend between three and four hours on lessons per week, with a total of six weeks of instruction (week four is a break week). On Thursday of each week of the course, the faculty will deliver a live hour-long web conference at 11 am Alaska / 12 pm Pacific / 1 pm Mountain / 2 pm Central / 3 pm Eastern.

What should I tell my presiding judge or funding agency so that my attendance will be approved?

Research shows that web courses are as effective as live courses, with less expense and greater convenience. This is an opportunity for the rural judge to gain a great amount of education without having to leave their docket or bench.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

This course qualifies for The National Judicial College Certificate in Judicial Development program General Jurisdiction Trial Skills, Special Court Trial Skills and Tribal Judicial Skills disciplines.

Register Now

Sep
17
Mon
2018
Evidence Challenges for Administrative Law Judges: Web-Based
Sep 17 – Nov 2 all-day
Evidence Challenges for Administrative Law Judges: Web-Based @ Tulsa | Oklahoma | United States

Are you making evidentiary rulings with confidence? This faculty-led online course will develop the skills needed to rule accurately on issues of hearsay, foundation, privileges and burden of proof, and make correct determinations concerning both expert witness and lay witness observation through real-world examples and interactive tasks.

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Why should I take this course?

The evidence issues that an Administrative Law Judge confronts can be complex and challenging. This web course offers a convenient way to explore ways to make evidentiary rulings quickly and confidently without having to leave your docket.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Apply fair hearing practices as they relate to evidentiary rulings.
  • Recognize common evidentiary issues in administrative hearings.
  • Apply basic principles of evidence to evidentiary issues as they arise in administrative hearings.
  • Identify and use procedural tools to resolve evidentiary issues.

Who should attend?

Full-time or part-time administrative law judges from urban or rural courts, including tribal courts, will find this course valuable.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty is composed of experienced administrative law judges who have a mastery of teaching online, and possess a mastery of the rules of evidence as they apply to limited jurisdiction and special courts.

How is this course taught?

Discussion assignments, writing assignments, reading, video and weekly live calls with faculty ensure this course is highly interactive, demanding, and educational. It is anticipated that you will spend between three and four hours on lessons per week, with a total of six weeks of instruction (week four is a break week). On Friday of each week of the course, the faculty will deliver a live hour-long web conference at 10 am Alaska / 11 am Pacific / 12 pm Mountain / 1 pm Central / 2 pm Eastern.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

Qualifies as an elective in the Certificate in Judicial Development, Administrative Law Adjudication Skills program.

Register

Sep
24
Mon
2018
Ethics for the Administrative Law Judge: Web-Based
Sep 24 – Nov 6 all-day
Ethics for the Administrative Law Judge: Web-Based @ Tulsa | Oklahoma | United States

Rule with confidence, knowing your decisions are ethically appropriate. This faculty-led online course uses hypothetical scenarios, interactive learning activities and online discussion to explore the ethical issues that face the administrative law judge. You’ll be able to apply the Model Code of Judicial Conduct for federal administrative law judges and explain the differences between their individual state codes and the Model Code.

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Why should I take this course?

This faculty-led online course will use hypothetical scenarios, interactive learning activities and online discussion to explore the ethical issues that face the administrative law judge. After this course, you will be able to rule with confidence, knowing their decisions are ethically appropriate; apply the Model Code of Judicial Conduct for federal administrative law judges; and explain the differences between their individual state codes and the Model Code. You will also learn about different cultures and their impact on the administrative hearing; and reduce bias and prejudice to maintain the integrity of the administrative process.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Identify and distinguish between proper and improper court-related behavior.
  • Identify and distinguish between proper and improper action in dealing with pro se/unrepresented litigants.
  • Identify and distinguish between proper and improper action in dealing with ex parte communication.
  • Identify and explain how bias and stereotyping may impact court proceedings.
  • Identify and explain how perceptions of immigrants, different cultures, and gender may impact court proceedings.
  • Nullify the effect of any bias and prejudice in order to maintain the integrity of the court for all participants.
  • Identify and rectify areas of bias in your courtroom.

Who should attend?

Full-time or part-time administrative law judges from urban or rural courts, including tribal courts, will find this course valuable.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty is composed of experienced administrative law judges, professors and professionals who have a mastery of teaching ethics in an online environment to limited jurisdiction and special court judges.

How is this course taught?

Discussion assignments, writing assignments, reading, video and weekly live calls with faculty ensure this course is highly interactive, demanding, and educational. It is anticipated that you will spend between three and four hours on lessons per week, with a total of six weeks of instruction (week four is a break week). On Friday of each week of the course, the faculty will deliver a live hour-long web conference at 11 am Alaska / 12 pm Pacific / 1 pm Mountain / 2 pm Central / 3 pm Eastern.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

This course qualifies for The National Judicial College Certificate in Judicial Development program Administrative Law Adjudication Skills and Dispute Resolution Skills disciplines.

Register

Oct
15
Mon
2018
General Jurisdiction (JS 610) @ The National Judicial College
Oct 15 – Oct 25 all-day
General Jurisdiction (JS 610) @ The National Judicial College | Reno | Nevada | United States

Jumpstart your judicial career! This course supplements state-sponsored judicial education by providing a solid foundation in the substance and theories that all new judges should have beginning their career on the bench. You are immersed in the core competencies of your profession. After attending this course, you will be able to manage your courtroom and individual cases, including cases involving self-represented litigants; conduct jury trials more effectively; summarize and apply developments in criminal law and procedure, judicial discretion, ethics, and sentencing; rule on evidence more confidently; make fair and unbiased decisions; and interact effectively with the media. The communication and listening skills learned in this course will enable you to communicate more effectively in your courtroom and with court staff.

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Extremely helpful to have presentations followed by opportunities to discuss. Enjoyed the practical down-to-earth tips. Learned from small group members and lunchroom discussions. Glad I was able to attend.
Hon. Sandra Donaghy, Cleveland, TN
The speakers were all highly informed on the subjects each presented. The topics were relevant to my needs as a new judge. The ability to hear different ways of handling issues from judges in other areas of the country exposed me to new ideas I may not have considered. Overall an excellent experience!
Hon. Philip T. Raymond, Macon, GA
I was truly engaged throughout the program and believe I learned a lot about how to be a judge. It opened my eyes on what I thought I already knew.
Hon. Michael P. Joyce, Olathe, KS

Why should I take this course?

Designed for the newer judge, the course introduces you to a variety of subjects and skills you will need and use in your judicial career. Both academic and experiential teaching techniques are used to provide you with the solid, basic understanding of various topics, from ruling on evidence to handling the self-represented litigant. In addition to the substantive law sessions, you will learn about courtroom control, ethical pitfalls and solutions, effective communication techniques, and decision making strategies. After your nine days at The National Judicial College, you will have the tools and resources to face most courtroom situations with confidence.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Rule on evidence more confidently,
  • Manage your courtroom and individual cases, including cases involving self-represented litigants,
  • Handle juries and sentencing more effectively.
  • Make fair and unbiased decisions.
  • Communicate more effectively from the bench.
  • Summarize and apply developments in civil case techniques,
  • Rule on evidence more confidently.
  • Create an appropriate case flow management system for your court.
  • Address electronically stored information discovery issues, and
  • Develop tools to address media inquiry and social media use in your courtroom.

Who should attend?

The course is designed for the newer general jurisdiction judge. Most participants find their attendance is most meaningful if they can attend six to twenty-four months after taking the bench. Experienced judges with or without law degrees who have completed the basic two-week Special Court Jurisdiction course are eligible to attend.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty is composed of experienced and knowledgeable judges, law professors and experts from other disciplines who have considerable experience in teaching judges and in using the techniques appropriate for a professional education.

How is this course taught?

The faculty use a variety of adult education methods including lecture, question and answer, debate, hypotheticals, problem-solving, various media, and panel discussions. There is a great deal of sharing of experience and practice, which occurs particularly in the daily small-group discussions conducted by group facilitators who have previously attended the course. The atmosphere is intended to be relaxed with as much time as possible for completing exercises, but the lectures are deliberately provocative in comparing methods, ideas, and procedures.

What should I tell my presiding judge or funding agency so that my attendance will be approved?

Being an effective and efficient general jurisdiction judge requires a range of skills unique to the judicial position. This course will provide me with nine full days of intensive emersion in those basic, necessary skills. Participants learn best practices in a variety of topics. In addition, I will have the opportunity to utilize those techniques in various courtroom scenarios and practicums. Some of the topics covered include courtroom management, evidence rulings, defendant control, and judicial handling of staff and the media.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

This course qualifies for 4 credits toward the Master of Judicial Studies Degree Program and Judicial Studies Doctoral Program at the University of Nevada, Reno upon successful completion of the course and passing the course exam. In addition, this course qualifies for The National Judicial College Certificate in Judicial Development program Dispute Resolution Skills, General Jurisdiction Trial Skills, Special Court Trial Skills and Tribal Judicial Skills disciplines.

Register

Special Court Jurisdiction: Advanced (JS 611) @ The National Judicial College
Oct 15 – Oct 25 all-day

This course is designed for judges recently appointed or elected to specialized courts. The course is filled with valuable information and practice opportunities in the areas of law that new judges encounter in the courtroom, such as criminal law and procedure; evidence issues; judicial writing; sentencing issues; ethical issues; caseflow management, and more.  Rich discussion with the course faculty, as well as with fellow students, will afford participants a unique opportunity to finely tune their basic bench skills.

PREREQUISITE: A law degree or completion of Special Court Jurisdiction or Fundamentals of Evidence. Judges completing Fundamentals of Evidence in 2018 as a prerequisite will have the cost of the web course deducted from their tuition for Special Court Jurisdiction: Advanced.
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Why should I take this course?

“Special courts” are those courts with a limited jurisdiction – such as traffic court, misdemeanor courts, domestic violence court, or small claims court, to name a few. Special courts are also courts serving a particular population, such as tribal courts. During this course, judges will receive a solid foundation in caseflow management, judicial writing, communications skills, evidence, legal reasoning, and more. The course will help judges gain confidence in knowing that they are properly following legal and procedural requirements in their role as judge.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Describe the role and responsibilities of a judge.
  • Recognize the evolving role of the judge as a change agent in the community.
  • Apply a practical approach to Fourth Amendment issues and use approved guidelines for issuing search warrants.
  • Conduct criminal hearings and trials in compliance with constitutional and statutory standards.
  • Make better decisions regarding the admissibility of evidence.
  • Work effectively with court interpreters.
  • Create an environment of fairness and impartiality in the courtroom.
  • Communicate effectively in the courtroom and with the media.
  • Determine appropriate sentencing alternatives for specific offenses and offenders.
  • Recognize and utilize the psychological profiles of criminal personalities in sentencing.
  • Manage the courtroom and individual cases efficiently and comfortably, including cases involving self-represented litigants.
  • Mitigate potential trial disruptions and utilize effective courtroom control measures.
  • Increase litigant, attorney and public confidence in the courts by using proper case, calendar and trial management techniques.
  • Improve writing skills.
  • Identify and practice numerous stress reduction techniques.

Who should attend?

This course is designed for special court judges who have graduated from law school, or more experienced judges without law degrees who have already completed the introductory two-week Special Court Jurisdiction or Fundamentals of Evidence. In addition, any judge of limited jurisdiction from urban or rural areas, who serves full-time or part-time, and has been recently elected or appointed to the bench should attend.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty is composed of experienced judges, professors, physicians, and consultants who have a mastery of teaching the skills needed to effectively manage a special court docket, and will provide valuable best practices information regarding limited jurisdiction adjudication.

How is this course taught?

The course is an introduction to every substantive and skill area a new judge will encounter on the bench, with an emphasis on practical application. The faculty encourages you to interact, and are available outside of the classroom for informal discussion of issues and problems. The class also meets in small discussion groups daily. Trained group facilitators will assist each group in working through problem solving exercises, while examining new ideas and complex issues. These facilitators are experienced judges who are graduates of the course and are willing to guide discussion and mentor members of their group. Friendships and networking among these groups often extends years after the course. Some segments of this course are held in conjunction with the General Jurisdiction course.

What should I tell my presiding judge or funding agency so that my attendance will be approved?

Increasing caseloads, public criticism, community demands and legal complexities make the judge’s job more difficult than ever before. This investment in judicial education will be returned to the court and community through the judge’s increased efficiency, better decision-making skills, better understanding of the law, and more confidence on the bench.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

This course qualifies for 4 credits toward the Master of Judicial Studies Degree Program and Judicial Studies Doctoral Program at the University of Nevada, Reno upon successful completion of the course and passing the course exam. In addition, this course qualifies for The National Judicial College Certificate in Judicial Development program Dispute Resolution Skills, Special Court Trial Skills and Tribal Judicial Skills disciplines.

Register Now

Oct
23
Tue
2018
Contemporary Issues in Probate @ Online Webcast
Oct 23 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Do you decide probate cases in your courtroom? This interactive webcast will examine some of the topical issues in probate, including undue influence claims in will contests, abuses of powers of attorney, the use of supported decision-making as an alternative to guardianship, and claims that arise from testamentary dispositions with blended families.

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After this presentation, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the typical forms in which undue influence claims present themselves;
  2. Assess the role of supported decision-making as an alternative to guardianship;
  3. Determine the various ways powers of attorney may financially exploit the principal; and
  4. Ascertain the challenges that arise at testamentary dispositions with blended families.
Register

Oct
29
Mon
2018
Mindfulness for Judges @ Santa Fe, New Mexico
Oct 29 – Nov 1 all-day

This four-day program, held in beautiful Santa Fe, New Mexico, is an opportunity to pause from the many complexities of being a judge and find some space to breathe and reflect. Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating non-judgmental awareness in the present moment. It is a practice of learning to pay attention to our thoughts, emotions, and physical sensations and acknowledging whatever is present and using that information to respond to the unfolding of our work and lives.

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Over the course of the four days, we will explore the most current research on mindfulness, including the neuroscience underlying mindfulness and the effects of mindfulness on work-related skills and behaviors. Specifically, participants will learn how mindfulness can help cope with trauma, and enhance leadership and communication. Mindfulness also …

  • develops your immune system;
  • aids with physiological responses to stress and negative emotions;
  • improves social relationships with family and strangers;
  • reduces stress, depression, and anxiety;
  • increases well-being and happiness;
  • increases openness to experience, conscientiousness, and agreeableness; and
  • improves your awareness that is more clear, nonconceptual, and flexible.

Research on mindfulness in the judiciary, for example, the effectiveness of mindfulness in addressing unconscious biases, will be a particular focus. In addition to the didactic portion of the program, we will spend a significant amount of time experiencing directly a wide variety of attention focusing and meditation practices, while leaving time for thoughtful dialogue and inquiry. By the end of the course you will have both experience with mindfulness practice along with the resources to keep your practice going for years to come.

After participating in this course, you will be able to:

  1. Define “mindfulness”;
  2. Describe why mindfulness is especially important for judges to employ;
  3. Summarize the benefits of mindfulness for both your personal and professional life; and
  4. Apply mindfulness to assist you in decision making.

Kelly, Zarcone, Mindfulness Training Has Positive Health Benefits: Interdisciplinary Research Shows How Powerful the Mind Really Is, located at https://nau.edu/research/feature-stories/mindfulness-training-has-positive-health-benefits (visited Apr. 15, 2016).

Drury Plaza Hotel

The hotel for this course will be the Drury Plaza Hotel. Experience the vibrant culture of New Mexico at this artful resort near the Historic Plaza, offering easy access to legendary activities and attractions. The Historic Plaza is a designated National Historic Landmark in Downtown Santa Fe that is home to various shops, live music venues, art galleries and restaurants. Explore Canyon Road. What began as a residential neighborhood has become a prominent Santa Fe arts district, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art.

The group room rate is $129 per night (plus applicable fees and taxes; currently 8.3%) for single or double occupancy. This special rate will be available until October 15, 2018, unless our room block is filled earlier. Please contact our Registrar’s Office with any questions.

Make your reservation by calling (505) 424-2175 and referencing “The National Judicial College.”

Register

Nov
5
Mon
2018
Designing and Presenting: A Faculty Development Workshop @ The National Judicial College
Nov 5 – Nov 8 all-day
Designing and Presenting: A Faculty Development Workshop @ The National Judicial College

Are your educational programs interesting, thought-provoking, fun, and enriching? The vast majority of people teaching in professional education are never exposed to adult education principles and practices. This workshop will help you to create educational programs that will keep your students’ attention.

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Why should I take this course?

Designed for judicial educators who want to improve their teaching skills, this workshop emphasizes a “learning by doing” model. Using Kolb’s Learning Style Inventory, you will identify your own learning style while recognizing the need to teach to your participants’ varied learning styles. The faculty will empower you to write effective learning objectives, which are the foundation of your teaching. Learning objectives help you to avoid the classic error of providing too much information. You will facilitate learning activities to improve comprehension and retention, avoiding the over-long, dry lecture. Structuring a presentation is an art. This workshop gives you the tools to create dynamic and interactive courses. To avoid death by PowerPoint, you will learn best practices in slide design. You will also learn the difference between teaching and reference materials.

The NJC’s faculty actively engages you throughout the workshop giving you the opportunity to present on at least two occasions, once in a team and once alone. With that understanding, you can improve upon your teaching effectiveness and ultimately ensure that your future learners achieve greater results.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Incorporate adult learning styles into presentations.
  • Draft appropriate learning objectives.
  • Design learning activities that will help your participants achieve the objectives.
  • Prepare an effective opening and closing for a session.
  • Create effective visual aids for your teaching.
  • Draft or locate materials to support and complement a session.
  • Apply effective delivery techniques.
  • Take reasonable risks when teaching because of increased confidence.

Who should attend?

This course is designed for anyone who teaches in continuing judicial education courses.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty includes Joseph Sawyer, director of the NJC’s faculty development courses; William Brunson, the NJC’s director of special projects; Kelly Tait, University of Nevada, Reno instructor and communications expert; and Gerald Hess, law professor at Gonzaga University School of Law.

How is this course taught?

This course is highly interactive and includes hands-on practice with PowerPoint, and provides opportunities for the participants to: take the Learning Style Inventory; draft learning objectives; create a group and solo presentation; write a presentation plan; and provide constructive feedback to their colleagues on effective teaching strategies.

What should I tell my presiding judge or funding agency so that my attendance will be approved?

If you are a leader, educator, or trainer in your court or agency, this class is essential. The skills you will learn will help you educate others about any judicial education topics that interest you. After this course, you should be able to communicate more effectively with greater confidence.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

Register

Logic & Opinion Writing (JS 621) @ Santa Fe, NM
Nov 5 – Nov 8 all-day

This course will assist anyone who writes judicial opinions become a more skillful and effective opinion writer. The first half of the course invites you to examine the underlying principles of syllogistic reasoning and how these principles may apply. The second half of the course addresses writing judicial opinions as a reasoned statement that justifies the outcome that the decision maker reaches. Anyone who writes judicial opinions — judges and others — will benefit from this unique class.

Register

Why should I take this course?

This course invites judges to more carefully and thoroughly examine the underlying principles of logical reasoning as applied to their decision-making and opinion-writing. Judicial writing is often as important as the determinations. Opinions should serve as a reasoned statement that justifies the outcome judges have reached.

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Define basic terms and concepts in the formal study of logic.
  • Describe the premises of inductive and deductive reasoning, especially categorical syllogisms.
  • Explain your conclusions and decision more cogently and precisely.
  • Explain the anatomy of an opinion with the use of orientation paragraphs, issue statements, findings of fact and conclusions of law or disposition.
  • Describe what is involved in the writing process.
  • State the emphasis to be given to style such as sentence structure, wordiness, and revision.
  • Use writing practices that improve written opinions.

Who should attend?

This course is designed for any judge, judicial officer, law clerk, or court-affiliated staffperson who must appraise the soundness of arguments presented to them and want to improve their legal writing skills.

Who are the members of the faculty?

The faculty consists of a philosophy professor who is also an attorney and a nationally recognized judicial writing instructor with experience in crafting judicial opinions.

How is this course taught?

The class is conducted through presentations, extensive class discussion and writing exercises. You will be asked to submit an opinion for review and analysis. Pre-course materials will be available via email for you to complete approximately six weeks prior to the course start date. Please plan to set aside approximately two to four hours of time to review and complete materials prior to the course.

What should I tell my presiding judge or funding agency so that my attendance will be approved?

A judge must evaluate legal argumentation in its many forms because it lies at the heart of the judging craft. The validity of arguments in briefs, memoranda, and oral presentations often depend upon the logical components. Even a rudimentary understanding of logic will enable a judge to perform more effectively and save time in legal analysis. Further, judges must frequently write opinions. This course will assist judges in analyzing and solving troublesome difficulties that they may encounter in preparing and writing an opinion.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

Drury Plaza Hotel

The hotel for this course will be the Drury Plaza Hotel. Experience the vibrant culture of New Mexico at this artful resort near the Historic Plaza, offering easy access to legendary activities and attractions. The Historic Plaza is a designated National Historic Landmark in Downtown Santa Fe that is home to various shops, live music venues, art galleries and restaurants. Explore Canyon Road. What began as a residential neighborhood has become a prominent Santa Fe arts district, with over a hundred art galleries and studios exhibiting Native American art and antiquities, traditional and modern Hispanic art, regional contemporary art, international folk art and international contemporary art.

The group room rate is $119 (prevailing government per diem) per night (plus applicable sales taxes, currently 15.313%) for single or double occupancy. This special rate will be available until October 15, 2018, unless our room block is filled earlier. Please contact our Registrar’s Office with any questions.

Make your reservation by calling (505) 424-2175 and referencing “The National Judicial College.”

This course qualifies for 2 credits toward the Master of Judicial Studies Degree Program and Judicial Studies Doctoral Program at the University of Nevada, Reno upon successful completion of the course and passing the course exam. In addition, this course qualifies for The National Judicial College Certificate in Judicial Development program Administrative Law Adjudication Skills, Dispute Resolution Skills, General Jurisdiction Trial Skills, Special Court Trial Skills and Tribal Judicial Skills disciplines.

Register

Taking the Bench: An Interactive, Online Course for New Trial Judges @ Web-Based
Nov 5 – Dec 7 all-day

The purpose of this online course is to provide education for judges who have been recently elected or appointed. The course is four weeks in length. Judges spend an average of six to eight hours per week on assignments, and you are required to attend a weekly web conference.

Register

What will I learn?

After completing this course, participants will be able to:

  • Ascertain how to address issues that judges face in transitioning from the bar to the bench.
  • Describe what new judges can expect to experience in their courtroom.
  • Identify what judges do in chambers that even trial lawyers wouldn’t necessarily be aware of.
  • Define what judges should and should not do in relating to their communities.

Who should attend?

Judges who have been recently elected or appointed.

Who are the members of the faculty?

Faculty are highly experienced judges and experts who bring a wealth of personal experience to their teaching. 2018 faculty includes Judge Kristi Harrington, Judge Jenifer Harris, Professor Benjamin Holden, Judge David Kimberley, and Judge Thomas Zonay.

How is this course taught?

Discussion assignments, writing assignments, reading, video, and weekly live calls with faculty ensure this course is highly interactive, demanding, and educational. It is anticipated that you will spend between six and eight hours on lessons per week, with a total of four weeks of instruction (week three is a break week). On Friday of each week of the course, the faculty will deliver a live hour-long web conference at 11 am Alaska / 12 pm Pacific / 1 pm Mountain / 2 pm Central / 3 pm Eastern.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

Qualifies as an elective in the Certificate in Judicial Development, General Jurisdiction Trial Skills program.

Register

Nov
8
Thu
2018
The Judge, the Court, and the Media: Developing Decorum @ Online Webcast
Nov 8 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

What do judges need to be aware of when establishing effective court-media relations? Prepare your court for high profile cases and inquiries from the press by maintaining transparency and clear communication with the media right now. How are interviews performed? What technology is allowed in the courtroom? Are there social media expectations? What are the dos and don’ts of relationship building and outreach efforts? This webcast will offer best practices for developing your court’s decorum and standards when communicating with media.

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After attending this webcast, judges will be able to:

  1. Identify best practices for establishing your court’s decorum in regards to communication with the media;
  2. Define how other courtrooms address the use of certain technology, such as cameras and cellular telephones;
  3. Ascertain ways to perform interviews and communicate via social media during a high profile case;
  4. Identify relationship building avenues; and
  5. Describe the administrative questions that your court may receive.
Register

Nov
15
Thu
2018
Sovereign Citizens as Challenging Litigants @ Online Webcast
Nov 15 @ 10:00 am – 11:15 am

Sovereign citizens believe they get to decide which laws to obey and which to ignore. They do not respect the authority of law enforcement, juries, or judges. Many believe they have no obligation to pay taxes, and they have no responsibility to display vehicle license plates. For judges and court staff, their special sovereign code language is often indecipherable. Many sovereigns believe that if they can find just the right combination of words, punctuation, paper, ink color and timing, they can have anything they want (e.g., freedom from taxes, unlimited wealth, life without licenses, fees or laws, etc.). The weapon of choice for sovereign citizens is paper. A simple traffic violation or pet-licensing case can end up provoking dozens of court filings containing hundreds of pages of pseudo-legal nonsense. Tax cases can be even worse. Sovereign filings in such legal battles can quickly exceed a thousand pages. While a normal criminal case docket might have 60 or 70 entries, many involving sovereigns have as many as 1,200. What can judges do to control these individuals? In this web conference, judges will learn the best methods for responding to these individuals and other difficult litigants.

Register

After attending this webcast, judges will be able to:

  1. Describe the history of the Sovereign Citizen movement:
  2. Identify a sovereign citizen in court: and
  3. Develop practices to effectively respond to sovereign citizens.
Register

Nov
30
Fri
2018
The Judge’s Role in Utilizing U Visa Certifications and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status @ Online Webcast
Nov 30 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

November 30, 2018 noon PST | Online Webcast | Tuition: Free

This webcast will provide insight into the judge’s role in utilizing U visa certifications and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS).

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Faculty will discuss tools provided in federal statutes that create an explicit role for state court judges to protect immigrant crime victims. Federal statutes authorize U visa certification for judges who hear criminal, family, and civil cases in which the immigrant has provided evidence about crime victimization.

This webcast will provide state court judges with information about the SIJS and U visa programs, the court’s role, and best practices for issuing SJIS findings and U visa certifications. The session will conclude with an overview of topics that the State Justice Institute (SJI) have funded and developed training materials for, in an effort to assist state court judges in adjudicating cases involving the care, custody, protection and the well-being of immigrant children and children living in immigrant families.

After this webcast, participants will be able to:

  1. Ascertain tools provided by Congress in federal statutes that create an explicit role for state court judges to protect immigrant crime victims;
  2. Describe federal statutes governing the U Visa and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), which are forms of immigration relief designed to rely on the expertise state courts when adjudicating cases involving crime victims and children; and
  3. Identify the range of topics for which the State Justice Institute (SJI) has funded and developed training materials to assist state court judges in adjudicating cases involving the care, custody, protection, and well-being of immigrant children and children living in immigrant families.
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Dec
6
Thu
2018
Neuroscience and the Law: Psychopathy in the Courtroom @ Online Webcast
Dec 6 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Are you interested in learning more about the intervention and prevention strategies available for defendants who have mental illnesses or disorders? This webcast will provide you with some insight into psychopathy in the courtroom, including definitions of mental illnesses that may present themselves in your courtroom. Finally, the webcast will provide suggestions concerning resources and relationships that you can establish to aid in managing these sometimes difficult cases.

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After attending this webcast, judges will be able to:

  1. Define “psychopathy,” “antisocial personality disorder,” and “externalizing disorders” and how substance abuse interacts with these illnesses; and
  2. Identify the brain functions, genetics, and environmental factors that result in these illnesses and what treatment providers can and can’t do in treating the illnesses; and
  3. Summarize potential resources and relationships that you can establish to help in the management of cases involving defendants who suffer from these mental illnesses.
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Dec
10
Mon
2018
Contemporary Threats to Judicial Independence and Freedom of the Press @ Washington, DC
Dec 10 – Dec 13 all-day
Contemporary Threats to Judicial Independence and Freedom of the Press @ Washington, DC

We have many reasons to celebrate America’s court system and its role in preserving our democracy, especially as we observe as other countries struggle to introduce the rule of law. However, there are many threats to the independence of our judiciary: some overt, some subtle, all designed to undermine public trust and confidence in our system of justice. In their purest form and in an ideal world, courts would not be subject to improper influence from other branches of government or from private or partisan interests. This timely course explores threats to judicial independence in the United States, emphasizing current threats in the context of historical lessons. The course will also explore ways in which judges can appropriately and ethically respond to these threats. Participants will also examine the First Amendment, and the media’s role in supporting democracy.

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After attending this course, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe current threats to the independence of the judiciary, and to freedom of the press;
  2.  Identify precursors that have occurred in other countries;
  3. Formulate an action plan to respond appropriately and ethically to current threats.

Whom should I contact for more information?

For more information, please contact the Registrar’s Office at (800) 255-8343 or registrar@judges.org.

This course will be held at the JW Marriott; on Day 4, December 13,  the sessions will be conducted at the National Press Club at 529 14th Street, Washington, D.C.

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Mar
20
Wed
2019
E-Discovery: Electronically Stored Information (ESI) in the Courtroom @ Online Webcast
Mar 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
What does electronic evidence or electronically stored information (ESI) encompass? What needs to be considered in terms of discovery and admissibility? This webcast will offer a description of ESI, as well as an overview of both the discovery and admission of ESI under the Federal Rules of Evidence.

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After this webcast, participants will be able to:

  1. Define Electronically Stored Information (ESI);
  2. Describe the challenges and opportunities posed by e-discovery; and
  3. Identify rules pertaining to ESI admissibility.
Register