Abuse of the Prestige of Judicial Office: SJI Ethics Webinar Series

This webinar is presented free of charge.

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Days & Times

9 a.m. Hawaii / 11 a.m. Alaska / Noon Pacific / 1 p.m. Mountain / 2 p.m. Central / 3 p.m. Eastern
Duration: 90 minutes

Course Location

Online

Course Fees

This webinar is presented free of charge.

$0

Online

April 27, 2022

Judges have been subjected to discipline for using the prestige of judicial office in such a manner as to advance, or give the appearance of advancing, their personal interests or those of others (including family members). This webinar will explore various contexts in which this type of conduct commonly occurs, including attempting to influence law enforcement officers or other judges, lending the prestige of judicial office to business, charitable, or community activities, activities and postings on social media, and serving as a reference for others.

Tuition

This webinar is presented free of charge. $0

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • What not to say during a traffic stop.
  • What requests for favors by friends and family should be rebuffed.
  • What abusing the prestige of office looks like on social media and in business and community activities.
  • When using judicial stationery is inappropriate.
  • When writing a letter of recommendation is permissible and impermissible.


Faculty:

Hon. Louis F. Dominguez, Municipal Court, Surprise, AZ & Chair, AZ Comm’n on Judicial Conduct
Cynthia Gray, Director, Center for Judicial Ethics, National Center for State Courts
Moderator:  Professor Keith R. Fisher, Distinguished Fellow, National Judicial College


Participation is open to judges and members of judicial disciplinary bodies.

Register Now.

Judges have been subjected to discipline for using the prestige of judicial office in such a manner as to advance, or give the appearance of advancing, their personal interests or those of others (including family members). This webinar will explore various contexts in which this type of conduct commonly occurs, including attempting to influence law enforcement officers or other judges, lending the prestige of judicial office to business, charitable, or community activities, activities and postings on social media, and serving as a reference for others.

Register
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