Sexual Harassment & Discrimination: SJI Ethics Webinar Series

This webinar is presented free of charge.

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Days & Times

9 a.m. Hawaii / 11 a.m. Alaska / Noon Pacific / 1 p.m. Mountain / 2 p.m. Central / 3 p.m. Eastern
Duration: 90 minutes

Course Location

Online

Course Fees

This webinar is presented free of charge.

$0

Online

April 26, 2022

Short of actual criminal behavior, no type of judicial misconduct in recent years has been more injurious to public confidence in the judiciary than instances of judges engaging in sexual harassment, predatory behavior, or discrimination on the basis of gender, gender preference, gender identity, or any of these with combined with other characteristics such as race and ethnicity. Participants will learn about these behaviors, how they are defined, and how judicial ethics principles treats them when engaged in by judges, court staff, and lawyers appearing before the court.

Tuition

This webinar is presented free of charge. $0

What will I learn?

During this course, you will learn to:

  • Internalize the judicial ethics imperative of acting responsibly and appropriately at all times (including not only in the courthouse and chambers but outside the workplace as well).
  • Identify offensive behaviors that can be considered sexual harassment
  • Distinguish discrimination from harassment and learn about the federal legal regime that applies to harassment and discrimination in the workplace
  • Describe the supervisory responsibilities of judges and judicial officers in the workplace in connection harassment and discrimination by court officials, court staff, lawyers, and others (including other judges).
  • Recognize the intersection of race and gender discrimination with sexual harassment.


Faculty:

Hon. Erica R. Yew,  Superior Court, Santa Clara County, CA & Member, CA Access to Justice Comm’n
Professor Keith R. Fisher, Distinguished Fellow, National Judicial College

Participation is open to judges and members of judicial disciplinary bodies.

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Short of actual criminal behavior, no type of judicial misconduct in recent years has been more injurious to public confidence in the judiciary than instances of judges engaging in sexual harassment, predatory behavior, or discrimination on the basis of gender, gender preference, gender identity, or any of these with combined with other characteristics such as race and ethnicity. Participants will learn about these behaviors, how they are defined, and how judicial ethics principles treats them when engaged in by judges, court staff, and lawyers appearing before the court.

Register
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